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The Twelve Steps

Option 1

  • Step One
  • Step Two
  • Step Three
  • Step Four
  • Step Five
  • Step Six
  • Step Seven
  • Step Eight
  • Step Nine
  • Step Ten
  • Step Eleven
  • Step Twelve

We admitted we were powerless over alcohol - that our lives had become unmanageable.
Admitted to an illness which is chronic – and gets progressively worse over time.
Powerless: lack of ability to control use of the substance on a continual basis.
Unmanageable – negative consequences to our lives and the lives of our loved ones, as a direct result of our addiction.

Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
Came = arrived
Came to = woke up
Came to believe = over time we woke up our spirituality.
A higher Power of our own understanding and choice.
Restore us to sanity: by using the twelve steps we can take responsibility for our own lives.

Make a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
We made a conscious decision to ‘do the right thing’ and make right choices for our recovery.
God = Our understanding of a power greater than ourselves from who/where we can depend on Good Orderly Direction.

Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
A journey to discover the truth about ourselves.
We take an honest and open look at ourselves, behaviours, attitudes and beliefs in addiction.
The alcoholics’ anonymous big book indicates that this should be in written format and gives us an example of how to do so on pg 59.

Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
Admitted – owned up and accepted who we had become in addiction.
How are you comfortable admitting something to your Higher Power?
Why is it important share the exact nature of our wrongs with another person?

Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
In step five we become aware of our defects of character or as the big book states ‘flaws in our character’
Step six asks that now we are aware of them, we need to become entirely ready to let them go and change.

Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
Ask our higher power to help us let go of old habits, behaviours and attitudes that are preventing us from achieving peace of mind.

Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
List of all the people we had hurt in our addiction
Over time we became willing to repair the damage we had done through our own actions in addiction.

Made direct amends to such people whenever possible, expect when to do so would injure them or others.
Made face to face amends to others affected by our addiction.
The exception to that is when the amends will only hurt the other person.

Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
Continued = daily inventory
We look at our own behaviours and attitudes throughout the day and watch for relapse warning signs.
Promptly admitted it: don’t leave it too long – it only builds up into something bigger.

Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God, as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
Pray: Communicate in your own language
Meditate: Take quiet time out to reflect and chat with your higher power. Walk, nature, silence,
How do you meditate?

Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics and to practice these principals in all our affairs.
A spiritual awakening is a guarantee of the twelve steps.
Carry the message – helping others in recovery, set up the A.A. room, tidy up, share honestly,
Practice these principals in all our affairs – the forgotten part of step twelve.
Honesty
Humility
Faith
Integrity
Acceptance

Option 2

  • A Story from Killian

    Looking back now, I realise that the last six years of my life has revolved around drinking and using. It did not start off bad, six cans once a week on a Saturday. The problem was I did not realise how much I was enjoying it. Anything I tried I loved it.

    I started smoking cigarettes when I was fourteen; trying to get that light headedness when inhaled quickly and repeatedly. Hash was soon introduced to me. I was in love, everything became easier. I started smoking before, during and after school. This saw me go through three mainstream schools.

    Read More
  • John's Story

     

    Hi I am John an alcoholic in recovery for the past 3 plus years

    Alcohol was part of my life for 35 years, during that period I worked, drank and raised a family in that order and I thought life was grand and that my drinking pattern was the norm and did not affect those around me in a negative way.

    When I took early retirement I tried to chance my lifestyle, sobriety was part of that change and for a while the future looked good but alas it did not last and I returned to the drink with

    Read More
  • Anonymous Story

     

    A Chara,

    My experience at the six day Residential Family Programme at Aiséirí in Cahir in August 2015 was positive, therapeutic, informative and life-changing for me.
    I was part of a group of six adults who are challenged by the devastating effects of addiction in family members and loved ones. The programme was very structured and was effectively facilitated by dedicated councillors who were extremely helpful and committed to helping us to increase our understanding of addiction.

    As each day unfolded I came to understand how to live my own life detached in a definite but caring way from

    Read More
  • Gus’s Story

    A friend suggested that we should run the Marathon raising much needed funds for Aiséirí. This had been a lifelong ambition and I had participated in small runs before but never any longer than 10 kilometres.

    I was full of enthusiasm and was anxious to get out on the road, maybe a little too eager. On the first day I planned to run ten miles and twenty miles by the end of the week! It wasn't long before I realised that my plan would not work, and it soon left me exhausted, I began to wonder: was this challenge too

    Read More
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Option3

Step One

We admitted we were powerless over alcohol - that our lives had become unmanageable.
Admitted to an illness which is chronic – and gets progressively worse over time.
Powerless: lack of ability to control use of the substance on a continual basis.
Unmanageable – negative consequences to our lives and the lives of our loved ones, as a direct result of our addiction.

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Reading List

  • Step One

    We admitted we were powerless over alcohol - that our lives had become unmanageable.
    Admitted to an illness which is chronic – and gets progressively worse over time.
    Powerless: lack of ability to control use of the substance on a continual basis.
    Unmanageable – negative consequences to our lives and the lives of our loved ones, as a direct result of our addiction.

  • Step Two

    Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
    Came = arrived
    Came to = woke up
    Came to believe = over time we woke up our spirituality.
    A higher Power of our own understanding and choice.
    Restore us to sanity: by using the twelve steps we can take responsibility for our own lives.

  • 1
 

Annual Report 2015

2015 annual report

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